1

Case Study: Development of a Low-Cost Weather Forecast Solution for Farmers

Published on by John Teel

Article Technical Rating: 6 out of 10

The following article is a case study contributed by Joseph Ricafort. Joseph’s project was selected as the most innovative project for a recent Predictable Designs contest. Joseph is a Test Engineer based in the Philippines and builds electronics projects in his spare time. He wants to build small projects that provide big impacts to those in need.

Read the rest of this article
14

An Introduction to Basic Electronics

Published on by John Teel

Many entrepreneurs launching a new electronic hardware product lack the engineering skills to design their own product. So they instead choose to outsource most, or all, of the development.

That’s of course fine, and outsourcing is a fantastic way to fill in any gaps in your own skill set. Nonetheless, I believe that a basic understanding of electronics is still important for anyone bringing an electronic product to market.

Read the rest of this article
26 A close up of a piece of paper Description generated with high confidence

Should I Keep My Product Idea a Secret to Prevent It From Being Stolen?

Published on by John Teel

Should you worry about someone stealing your idea? The simple answer is no, not really.

The most common myth believed by new entrepreneurs is that someone may steal their amazing idea if they don’t keep it secret.

The problem with this myth is that it stems from the core belief that your idea has value. Let me brutally honest with you, an idea alone has no real value!

Read the rest of this article
6

Crowdfunding for Hardware Startups

Published on by John Teel

Article Technical Rating: 1 out of 10

Developing and launching a new hardware product is expensive. It’s also incredibly risky. Fortunately, there is a way to help solve both of these problems: crowdfunding.

Most hardware startups know about crowdfunding, but how do you make it a success? You just create a campaign page about your amazing new product on crowdfunding websites such as Kickstarter, Indiegogo, or CrowdSupply. The world will then come rushing in to give you money! Piece of cake, right?

Read the rest of this article
8

Should I create a Proof-of-Concept prototype for my new product?

Published on by John Teel

As the name implies, the purpose of a Proof-of-Concept (POC) prototype is to prove your product concept. A POC answers if a product is feasible. Whereas, a standard prototype answers how to make your product.

In most cases a POC prototype is only used internally to determine the practicality of a new product. Customers will rarely see a POC prototype. When demonstrating your product to customers you will usually need something much closer to the manufacturable version of your product.

Read the rest of this article
15

From Arduino Prototype to Manufacturable Product

Published on by John Teel

Article Technical Rating: 7 out of 10

Creating a prototype based on an Arduino (or Genuino outside the US) is an excellent start to bringing a new electronic hardware product to market.

The Arduino is an ideal platform for proving your product concept. However, there is still a lot of engineering work required to turn it into a product that can be manufactured and sold.

Read the rest of this article
11

How to Choose the Best Development Kit: The Ultimate Guide for Beginners

Published on by John Teel

Article Technical Rating: 6 out of 10

If you’re looking to build a proof-of-concept (POC) prototype for a new product idea, or perhaps you’re just wanting to learn more about electronics development, then the first step is to choose a development kit (also called a development board).

A development kit will serve as the brains of your project and will communicate with all the interconnected electronic components.

Read the rest of this article
20

How can I get my product to market if I have no money or experience?

Published on by John Teel

You must remember that the true value is in the execution of an idea, and not just the idea alone. This is why no one steals product ideas, instead they wait and “steal” successful, proven products.

This means that to succeed with your product you’re going to have to commit to doing more than just coming up with the great idea. The idea is the easy part, but nothing of real value is ever easy.

Read the rest of this article

Predictable Designs LLC, 10645 N. Oracle Rd, Suite 121-117, Oro Valley, AZ 85737 USA
[email protected], Phone: (520) 261-1844 (for fastest repsponse please email instead of call)
Copyright 2019 by Predictable Designs LLC

This website uses cookies. By continuing you consent to the use of cookies and the collection of your IP address. See our privacy policy for more information.